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Top 10 Kerosene Heaters 2016

In case you want a transportable, cost-effective solution for heating a workshop, garage, outdoor area or even a room in your home, this sort of kerosene heaters will take the chill off nicely. No electricity cords are needed, and they can last for up to 12 hours on a single tank.

Heatstar By Enerco F170375 Forced Air kerosene heater with Thermostat HS175KT, 175KDyna Glo Delux KFA220DGD Kerosene Forced Air Heater, 180K or 220K BTUDura Heat Portable Forced Air Heater, 75,000 BTU - DFA75TSengoku CTN-110 KeroHeat 10,000-BTU Portable Radiant Kerosene HeaterDyna-Glo RMC-55R7B Indoor Kerosene Radiant Heater, 10000 BTU, BlackSengoku CV-23K KeroHeat Convection 23,500-BTU Portable Kerosene HeaterDura Heat Convection Kerosene Heater, 23,000 BTU, Indoor- DH2304Dyna-Glo RMC-95C6B Indoor Kerosene Convection Heater, 23000 BTU, BlackSengoku OR-77 HeatMate Omni-Radiant 10,000-BTU Portable Kerosene HeaterDyna-Glo RMC-FA60DGD 30,000 - 60,000 BTU Liquid Propane Forced Air Heater

What Separates a Good Kerosene Heater From a Great One?

The first feature you'll want to take into account whenever shopping for a kerosene heater is its BTUs (British Thermal Units). While the metrics surrounding a BTU can be a bit confusing, the thing to know is that an average kerosene heater should provide between 8,000-15,000 BTUs, whereas a superior kerosene heater might provide as many as 25,000 BTUs, or more.

A kerosene heater with high BTUs should be capable of warming a small room almost immediately. Beyond that, certain heaters boast a wider range than others. By way of example, consider that an inexpensive heater might have a range of 300 sq ft (i.e., a tiny bedroom), whereas a top-of-the-line heater might have a range of 5,000 sq ft (i.e., a full-court gym or a social hall).

Every kerosene heater needs fuel. What differentiates one model from another is how long it can last based on one tank of fuel. Most heaters can operate for 8-10 hrs after being refueled, while others can last as long as 15 hrs, or even more. This is relevant in that extra kerosene equates to extra costs, which is why you'll want to research how long a heater's power can last, along with how much fuel each model's storage can hold.

Before purchasing a heater, you'll want to take note of whether it runs on straight kerosene, or whether it also requires batteries (or outlet power). In addition, you'll want to take note of a heater's weight. Certain kerosene heaters weigh 20-30 lbs, and they feature wheels and handles for portability. Other models weigh 60-70 lbs, and they are extremely unwieldy, at best.

Several Safety Tips for Operating a Kerosene Heater


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Kerosene heaters are a tremendous resource for warming a room, or even a small campsite. But the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) warns that any kerosene heater needs to be operated with a degree of caution. There have been incidents, for example, via which people have mistakenly filled their kerosene heaters up with gasoline. This is usually the result of two or more multi-gallon containers being situated side-by-side. The best way to avoid such a mishap is by marking each of your multi-gallon containers, and color-coding each of those containers, as well.

When it comes time to refill your kerosene heater, turn the heater off and give it several minutes to cool. Once the heater is at room temperature, carry it outside to avoid any indoor kerosene spills. Fill the heater up, and then hose the surrounding area down. Make sure to reattach any safety valves or caps before carrying the heater inside and turning it back on.

If you are operating a kerosene heater indoors, make it a point to open a window at least once a day. Kerosene heaters emit carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide in very minor doses, but any heater operating for an airtight atmosphere could cause these gases to accumulate. In addition, you'll want to avoid placing any papers or books within a kerosene heater's reach. Paper and cardboard aren't only flammable, they're capable of getting knocked into a heater's central core.

Finally, get in the habit of confirming that any kerosene heater has been turned off before you leave it for an extended period of time. The majority of modern heaters have been designed with built-in safety features (i.e., auto shut-off), but that doesn't change the fact that an owner's vigilance might hold the key to preventing any accidental fire.

A Brief History of Kerosene (By Way of Its Inventor)


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During the 1840s, a Canadian geologist named Abraham Gesner developed a uniform process for refining fuel from coal, oil shale, or asphalt. Convinced that his fuel was cheaper and cleaner than any other fuel-oils on the market, Gesner trademarked his new product under the name "kerosene," which is based on a Greek word for wax.

In the mid-1850s, Gesner opened a Long Island refinery which he called North American Kerosene Gaslight Company. Almost immediately, business skyrocketed to an extent that Gesner could scarcely keep up with the demand. Gesner responded by importing petroleum, an oil-based commodity that allowed for distilling liquid kerosene a bit quicker. Having solved the issue, Gesner shifted to writing a series of articles extolling the benefits of his product.

During the late 1850s, Abraham Gesner sold North American Kerosene to a Brooklyn-based competitor named Astral Oil. Gesner returned to Nova Scotia, where he was employed as a Natural History Professor until his death in 1864.

Standard Oil absorbed North American Kerosene (along with Astral Oil) toward the end of the 1870s. Standard went on to become the largest oil company in the world - a veritable monopoly that eventually needed to be broken up by the U.S. Supreme Court. Kerosene has been slightly superseded over the past century thanks to a combination of technology, electricity, and more efficient types of fuels. Today, kerosene is still a billion-dollar industry, and yet it only accounts for .1% of all petroleum-related revenues worldwide.


#10.Dyna-Glo RMC-FA60DGD 30,000 - 60,000 BTU Liquid Propane Forced Air Heater


This DynaGlo Delux portable propane forced air heater produce’s 30,000 to 60,000 BTU’s of warmth and heats up to 1,350 square feet. Great for outdoor applications, including construction sites, agricultural buildings, industrial workspaces and more. Blower included with 325 CFM, 110 volts of blower power supply, 14 hour fuel time with 20lb tank, continuous spark igniter. CSA approved. 1-year limited warranty, 16.78 lb whip weight, Dimensions 20.25"L x 10.25"W x 18"H


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#9.Sengoku OR-77 HeatMate Omni-Radiant 10,000-BTU Portable Kerosene Heater


Sengoku's Heat Mate unique Indoor/Outdoor portable omni-radiant kerosene heater is safe to use;economical to operate. No electricity needed;uses 1K clear kerosene to provide excellent outdoor/indoor heat source. Ideal for a small room;patio;deck;gazebo;cabins. Equipped with easy push button start and automatic safety shut off.


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#8.Dyna-Glo RMC-95C6B Indoor Kerosene Convection Heater, 23000 BTU, Black


The Dyna-Glo RMC-95C6B Indoor Wick Kerosene Heater generates 360 Degree of convection heat, to heat homes, garages, workshops, enclosed porches, basements, warehouses and enclosed porches. Rated at 23,000-BTUs, the RMC-95C6B heats up to 1,000-square feet for 8-12 hours (depending on the grade of kerosene used and the age of the wick) using only 1 full 1.9-gallon tank of kerosene. This product is UL certified which means it has been thoroughly tested and certified and meets all applicable standards, which cover important safety and quality requirements. It includes a manual shutoff knob, safety tip switch that automatically shuts off the heater if it is bumped or knocked over. The RMC-95C6B measures 17.52-Inch (L) by 17.52-Inch (W) by 26.97-Inch (H) and weighs 23.15-pounds. The Dyna-Glo RMC-95C6B Indoor Wick Kerosene Heater comes with a 1-year limited warranty that protects against defects in materials and workmanship.


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#7.Dura Heat Convection Kerosene Heater, 23,000 BTU, Indoor- DH2304


This Dura Heat convection style heater is a popular choice. It projects 23,000 BTU's of heat in a 360-degree radius, helping to heat a large area. Also great for those winter power outages and emergency situations as it provides both heat and light when the power is out. As with any fuel burning heater, annual maintenance is required. Attention: In order to prevent potential Kerosene spills from Dura Heat brand kerosene indoor heaters and/or kerosene forced air heaters, all fuel should be properly removed from the kerosene heater fuel tank prior to transportation of the heater or disposal of the heater for any reason. Fuel can be removed by operating the heater until the fuel is emptied from the tank, or by physically removing the fuel. Owner/Operator of the heater is responsible for the safe removal of fuel from this heater; all fuel removed from the fuel tank needs to be properly stored or disposed of according to all federal, state, and local regulations. In the event of non-compliance to proper fuel removal/disposal, the owner/operator is responsible for any and all monetary fines and/or penalties.


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#6.Sengoku CV-23K KeroHeat Convection 23,500-BTU Portable Kerosene Heater


So far, we love this heater ! We have 1100 square ft, and in about an hour, it brought the temp from 62 to 71 ! Some facts to consider..... it smells a bit when you first light it. So I light it out in the hallway before bringing it in after about 5 mins. It smells when turned off. So I do the same, bring it out and shut it off in the hall with ventilation, doing those things keeps the smell out of the house.

It comes with a cheap siphon to fill it, seems to me that's not going to last too long, so I'm looking into maybe a funnel or a better siphon. Fill it outside !!! you will spill some. The spill tray works great and comes off easy for cleaning. I manage to keep my house at 71 degrees F. today, without turning on my heat, which is considerably more expensive !

Easy assembly, and seems to be well built. I'll update as time goes on.


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#5.Dyna-Glo RMC-55R7B Indoor Kerosene Radiant Heater, 10000 BTU, Black


The Dyna-Glo RMC-55R7B Indoor Wick Kerosene Heater generates infra-red radiant heat that warms people and objects, rather than the air. It can be used to heat homes, garages, workshops, enclosed porches, basements, warehouses and enclosed porches. Rated at 10,000-BTUs, the RMC-55R7B heats up to 500-square feet for up to 13 hours (depending on the grade of kerosene used and the age of the wick) using only 1 full 1.0 gallon tank of kerosene. This product is UL certified which means it has been thoroughly tested and certified and meets all applicable standards, which cover important safety and quality requirements. It includes a manual shutoff knob, safety tip switch that automatically shuts off the heater if it is bumped or knocked over. The RMC-55R7B measures 22.32-Inch (L) by 11.89-Inch (W) by 19.29-Inch (H) and weighs 20.94-pounds. The Dyna-Glo RMC-55R7B Indoor Wick Kerosene Heater comes with a 1-year limited warranty that protects against defects in materials and workmanship.


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#4.Sengoku CTN-110 KeroHeat 10,000-BTU Portable Radiant Kerosene Heater


As energy costs sky rocket and temperatures plunge, KeroHeat heaters provide an economical alternative way to zone heat your home or other indoor space. KeroHeat heaters are self contained and operate without the need for electrical power. Combined with portability and ease of use this makes KeroHeat heaters an excellent solution to your emergency heating needs. Provides warmth and comfort even in the coldest indoor spaces.


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#3.Dura Heat Portable Forced Air Heater, 75,000 BTU - DFA75T


This 75,000 BTU portable kerosene forced air heater by Dura Heat features a heavy duty ceramic ignitor, built-in thermostat, auxiliary power outlet, fuse protected electrical system, one-touch electronic start ignition, "run time" fuel gauge, easy lift handle and a high capacity sealed fan motor. This multi-fuel capable heater has been tested with K-1 kerosene, #1 and #2 fuel oil and diesel, JP-8 and Jet-A fuels. This powerful heater is the perfect choice for temporary heating needs, light construction, garage work, or the do-it-yourselfer. Requires 120V grounded outlet for proper operation.Attention: In order to prevent potential Kerosene spills from Dura Heat brand kerosene indoor heaters and/or kerosene forced air heaters, all fuel should be properly removed from the kerosene heater fuel tank prior to transportation of the heater or disposal of the heater for any reason.


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#2.Dyna Glo Delux KFA220DGD Kerosene Forced Air Heater, 180K or 220K BTU


Dyna-Glo Deluxe portable multi-fuel forced air heaters provide immediate relief from cold weather working conditions. Ideal for residential, industrial and commercial applications, multi-fuel heaters require little to no assembly and are 98% fuel efficient. This multi-fuel forced air heaters operates on 1 K kerosene, # 1 diesel and # 1 fuel oil. Heating coverage areas up to 5,200 square feet. Two heat setting at 180K BTUs and 220K BTUs for two heaters in one. Patent pending variable heat controls, self diagnostics, thermostat, LED readout and cord wrap features included. Dual Heat Technology Comfort Control Thermostat Built-in Digital Diagnostics Built-in Air Pressure Gauge Run Time Fuel Gauge Secondary Power Outlet 10" Flat-free Wheels Front & Rear Lift Handles & Cord Wrap Flameout Sensor Sturdy, Rugged Construction.


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#1.Heatstar By Enerco F170375 Forced Air kerosene heater with Thermostat HS175KT, 175K


Great heater! Warms up my 32' x 40' garage with a 10' ceiling from 22 deg to 65 deg F in about 30 min! Its a bit noisy but can't complain when running this industrial quality machine! Puts off a little smoke poof when it starts, so I point it out the garage door for the first 60 sec until it's glowing hot then spin it around inside and close up shop. This is a direct fired heater so if you ran it long enough closed up in a garage you'll have to worry about combustion byproducts building up.. so be safe where and how you use it. I like to keep mine running for a good bit instead of letting the thermostat cycle to help reduce the smell in the garage and I've adjusted the fuel pressure up a tad from factory to get the cone glowing a bit better. That helps If you start to notice a touch of smokiness... the redder your front cone the more complete the combustion, the less smell.


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