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Top 10 Film Cameras 2017

For all you antique faculty snappers accessible who nevertheless admire the satisfactory of a film, any such cameras will give you the photographs you are searching out. Whether you're returning to a vintage hobby or mastering to shoot for the primary time, there is something right here for anyone, inclusive of those seeking the immediate gratification of Polaroid-style models.

Nikon F6 AF 35mm Film SLR Camera (Body Only)Canon EOS Rebel 2000 35mm Film SLR Camera Kit with 28-80mm LensFujifilm Instax Mini 8 Instant Film Camera (Black)Pentax K1000 Camera with 50mm (f/2.0) LensLomography Diana F+ Medium Format Camera with FlashDisposable Kodak Camera [Camera] 3PackNikon FM-10 SLR Camera with 35-70mm f/3.5-4.8 Zoom LensFujifilm Instax Wide 300 Instant Film Camera (Black)Konstruktor F

Everything Old Is For Hipsters

At a certain point in our recent history, being on the cutting edge ceased to be cool. Conversely, there was a time when having your hands on the latest technology was the ultimate status symbol. There are still sectors where this ethos rings true, particularly in the cell phone market, but another subset of individuals seems intent on ruining everything nostalgic by co-opting its aesthetics and almost willfully ignoring any deeper underlying benefits.

I'm talking about hipsters, the great, benign blight on modern urban society. If it's a piece of technology developed after 1980, they don't want to know about it–unless, of course, it's something brand new that's designed to look like something produced before 1980. Theirs is a superficial movement, after all.

The shame of it is that hipster culture uses some of the coolest stuff mankind has ever produced, technological advances that are arguably better suited for their purposes than their modern equivalents. Vinyl records come to mind, the bit rates of which offer much deeper bass, crystalline highs, and a generally more dynamic sound profile than the digitized, over-compressed micro-files that stream through the airwaves to your Pandora station.

Film cameras have, for better or worse, fallen victim to trendiness, as well. The only bright side is that it's helped keep film itself in production by companies like Kodak, who have consistently threatened to close up shop. And without that film, these cameras become vintage paperweights.

It's that film that makes all the difference. All the cameras on our list either operate with standard 35mm stock, or with proprietary instant development film akin to Polaroids.

A few of these are SLRs, or Single Reflex Lens cameras, which use pentaprisms and mirrors to reflect incoming light through the lens and to your eyepiece. When you fire the shutter, the mirror moves out of the way and the shutter doors open to expose the film to light for however long you've set the camera to stay open.

Degrees Of Control


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>In addition to the SLRs described above, and the Polaroid-style cameras mentioned just before that, there is also one camera on our list that you actually build yourself. Such a camera is perfect for a curious enthusiast, a youngster interested in photography, or a serious student looking to bolster his or her knowledge about a film camera's inner workings.

Each of the cameras on our list has its appeal to a specific type of photographer, sometimes determined by the kind of pictures you want to take, and other times determined by how you want to be perceived as you take those pictures.

While the camera that you actually build yourself is great for students to learn about a camera's mechanics, assembly, and maintenance, it doesn't make the best camera for studying actual photography. There are too many risks involved in the build process that could confuse a young student about exposure levels and the results they can expect from a certain combination of settings.

If you're trying to learn photography as a skill and an art form, the SLRs on our list are your best bet. These, when used in their manual modes, will put you in control of your shutter speed, your aperture, and your focus, so that you can take total control over the exposure, composition, and clarity of your images.

While the instant cameras on this list are more for fun than anything else, they, too, present the possibility to create great art. The problem with these is that they have very few variables for you to adjust, you're stuck at one focal length, and you have no control over the developing process beyond shaking the photo to make it develop faster (side note: that actually doesn't work).

Film's Slow Development


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While nobody technically exposed a single photographic image until 1816, when one man temporarily exposed portions of a sheet of paper coated in silver chloride, there has been a kind of image capture available to us reaching back many millennia.

The camera obscura significantly predates modern photographic equipment, but its design led inventors experimenting with potential techniques for immortalizing images to the film exposure and development processes still used today. The first of those immortal experiments were the Daguerreotypes and calotypes of 1839 and 1840 respectively.

George Eastman, founder of Kodak, sold his first paper film stock in 1885 before eventually switching to celluloid film about four years later. He also produced the first cameras intended for mass consumption, two simple, box cameras that were inexpensive enough for a great many people to afford.

The first 30 years of the 1900s saw the gradual but significant rise of 35mm as a film standard, with the Japanese company Canon releasing its first 35mm rangefinder in 1936, just as the country's war with China began to reach epic, and eventually global, proportions.

From there, camera manufacturers like Nikon and Pentax poured resources into SLR technology that shot 35mm over all other formats, and even after the digital revolution came and threatened to wipe out film as we know it, those 35mm SLR designs persist as the standard bearers of film photography.


#10.Konstruktor F


accessorize your Konstruktor camera with flash to brighten up your low light shots The Konstruktor takes DIY to a whole new level. This camera kit lets you build your very own fully-working 35mm plastic SLR camera from scratch The Konstruktor is a perfect way to learn and understand analogue photography to its core. From assembling the camera to shooting with it, this DIY kit is a perfect tool to enrich your analogue experience. The Konstruktor is the world''s first plastic 35mm SLR. This compact camera has a whole range of exciting features such as a top-down viewfinder, multiple exposure function, bulb setting for long exposures and a detachable 50mm f/10 lens.


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#9.Fujifilm Instax Wide 300 Instant Film Camera (Black)


Fujifilm Instax Wide 300 Instant Film Camera

Record memories at parties and other fun gatherings with the Fujifilm INSTAX Wide 300 Instant Camera.

The close-up lens even makes taking selfies easy.

It features an automatic flash for low light shooting and a focal zoom dial.

This wide instant camera is easy and fun for everyone to use and it makes an ideal gift.


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#8.Nikon FM-10 SLR Camera with 35-70mm f/3.5-4.8 Zoom Lens


For the individual who likes to take total control, the FM10 lets you make the choices.In this kit, the FM10 body is fitted with Nikon's 35mm to 70mm lens.Full manual control.Selectable shutter speeds up to 1/2000th of 1 second, 'B' Setting. Depth of field Preview.


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#7.Polaroid PIC-300 Instant Film Camera (Purple)


To use, simply snap, print, and share your photos - that's it! Take it on the go so you can send friends and family home with pictures of their own within minutes. The film counts down like a disposable camera so you know how many pictures are left before you change the film.


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#6.Disposable Kodak Camera [Camera] 3Pack


My drug store stopped carrying the disposable Kodak camera with a flash, which I've liked so much during my sixties. I am somewhat allergic to iPhones so this little camera works just fine for me. I carry it in my jacket pocket. You can use the flash or not. The picture quality is fine for my flower and cat pictures. My mother used to give us kids this camera.


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#5.Lomography Diana F+ Medium Format Camera with Flash


The brand new Diana F+ is a faithful reproduction and a loving homage to the classic Flash Diana - with a few new features tossed in. First off, it includes a retro-styled electronic flash which fires a burst of white or colored light at your subject. Included adapters allow you to use the Diana Flash on standard hotshoe cameras (like the LC-A+ and Fisheye 2) or use a hotshoe flash on Diana F+ body. Its plastic lens, 2 shutter settings (daylight & "B"), 3 aperture settings, and manual focus are all hallmarks of the original Diana. And on top of that, the Diana F+ offers a removable lens and super-small aperture for pinhole images, two image formats (12 or 16 square shots on a standard 120 roll), an endless panorama feature that allows for unlimited and nearly seamless panoramic shots, and both a standard tripod thread & shutter lock for easy shake-free long exposures. Each package includes the new "Diana Vignettes, More True Tales & Short Stories" book - packed with over 200 pages of Diana history, Diana+ images, and truly off-the-wall fictional stories. Uses all varieties of medium format 120 film.


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#4.Pentax K1000 Camera with 50mm (f/2.0) Lens


The K1000 is an almost all metal, mechanically (springs, gears, levers) controlled, manual-focus SLR with manual exposure control. It is completely operable without batteries. Batteries are only required (one A76 or S76, or LR44 or SR44) for the light metering information system. This consists of a centre-the-needle exposure control system using a galvanometer needle pointer moving between vertically arranged +/– over/underexposure markers at the right side of the viewfinder to indicate the readings of the built-in full-scene averaging, cadmium sulfide (CdS)battery light meter versus the actual camera settings. The meter does not have a true on/off switch and the lens cap must be attached to the lens to prevent draining the K1000's battery when it is not in use.


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#3.Fujifilm Instax Mini 8 Instant Film Camera (Black)


The new, compact INSTAX Mini 8 color models preserve the ease of use and attractive design elements of the existing INSTAX Mini series. At the same time, the Mini 8 cameras offer new features and enhancements. You will instantly notice a slimmer and lighter body. The INSTAX Mini 8 is approximately10% smaller than the Mini 7S in volume ratio. It is now even easier for the consumer to carry around an INSTAX with them everywhere.


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#2.Canon EOS Rebel 2000 35mm Film SLR Camera Kit with 28-80mm Lens


The Canon EOS Rebel 2000 is an affordable, lightweight, and full-featured automatic 35mm SLR for both beginning and advanced amateur photographers. It offers a host of special modes for specific shooting situations, including full auto, manual, night scene, and aperture portrait, landscape, and more. It also has shutter-speed aperture priority modes--although most users will inevitably leave thecamera in full auto mode a majority of the time and the cameraperforms very well that way. Just remember that the empty rectanglesymbol on the mode dial is for full auto.


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#1.Nikon F6 AF 35mm Film SLR Camera (Body Only)


Absolutely amazing camera. Powerful and rugged. Perfect for studio or field. Highly recommend for anyone looking for an upgrade to their 35mm setup. Best 35mm I've used. Personally, I only use a few lenses, as I do fine arts photography with it, but all the nifty features like menus for settings are wonderful. I even love the little things like having the option to rewind the film and leave the leader out an inch. That makes it 100% easier to work with in the darkroom. I can just pull the film out without having to either fish for it with a tool or having to crack open the metal cassette. But the focusing is sharp and snappy fast, the flash sync in the studio is versatile, the button layouts are well thought out, and even the depth of field preview is well done. I just love everything about this camera. I keep the others around for what they're good at, but this is the best general purpose camera for my photo work. I love my Mamiya RZ67II, but if I could have a Nikon F6 equivalent in medium format, that would be a dream come true.


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